Flora & Fauna - Trees of Andalucía

The pink and white Almond tree blossoms colour the countryside of Andalucia in Springtime. © Michelle Chaplow
The pink and white Almond tree blossoms colour the countryside of Andalucia in Springtime.

Trees of Andalucia

A brief guide to some of the common trees found in Andalucia.

Alder / aliso (Alnus glutinosa)
Deciduous trees found along river valleys.

Almond Tree (Prunus dulcis)
Almond trees are an important crop producing tree in Andalucia. Their fresh pink and white blossoms colour the countryside in Spring with the harvest ready mid-autumn.

Ash tree / Fresno (Fraxinus)
This is generally found near small brooks and springs and larger river valeys. Chestnut Tree / Castaño (Castanea sativat) Likes the moist areas and silica soil and altitudes between 400 and 1000m.

Avocado Tree / Aguacate (Persea americana)
Native to Mexico, Central America and Guam, the Avocado tree is an important crop producer in Andalucia with Almuñecar on Granada’s Costa Tropical a major centre of production. It is not uncommon to find groves in other parts of Andalucia, across Málaga province, for example, with many private homes enjoying crops from trees that landscape their gardens.

Carob Tree / Algarrobo (Ceratonia siliqua)
Grows spontaneously all over remoter areas, mixed with the pines. It can withstand high temperatures and is found between 600 and 1000m.

 

© Michelle Chaplow Cork oak forests, Andalucia
Cork oak forests, Andalucia

Cork oak / Alcornoque (Quercus suber)
Cork is also found mainy to west in Cadiz Province around Mount Alcornoque. Acorns are the staple diet of the black pigs whose cured ham - pata negra - is the local delicacy.

Elm / olmo (Ulmus)
Deciduous trees found along river valleys.

Enebro (Juniperus communis)
Commonly found.

Evergreen Oak / Encina (Quercus ilex)
The common Quercus found all over the Mediterranean is found here too.

Fig Tree (Ficus carica)
Fig trees are a common sight in Andalucia and are considered indiginous to the area probably originated either in the Mediterranean or Southwest Asia.

Gall Oak / Quejigo (Quercus faqinea)
The common Quercus found all over the Mediterranean is found here too.

Juniper (Juniperus phoenicea)
The juniper is commonly found in Andalucia.

Jacaranda (Jacaranda mimosifolia)
The purple-flowerd jacaranda is common in Andalucia.

Jacaranda tree in flower in the Plaza de la Merced. © Michelle Chaplow
Jacaranda tree in flower in the Plaza de la Merced.

Lemon / Limón (Citrus limon)
Lemon trees are found throughout Andalucia and are an important crop producing tree.

© Michelle Chaplow Lemon Groves, Andalucia
Lemon Groves, Andalucia

Maple / arce
Deciduous trees found along river valleys.

Orange/Naranjo (Citrus sinensis)
The Orange tree is celebrated throughout its Andalusion history, thanks to the aromatic blossoms that still bring fame to cities like Seville. It is a major crop producing tree and the ornamenal version is used to landscape cities and towns. It is found across the region.

Polar / álamo
Deciduous trees found along river valleys.

 

© Michelle Chaplow Pino piñonero, Stone pine, umbrella pine.
Pino piñonero, Stone pine, umbrella pine.

Pinsapo Spanish Fir / Pinsapo (Abies Pinsapo)
In the drier areas we find the region's famous pine trees. In 1837, during one of his exploratory visits to the south of the Iberian Peninsula, the Swiss Botanist Edmond Boisser discovered a new species of tree: Abies Pinsapo, popularly known as the pinsapo pine or Spanish fir. Pinus pinaster aiton is also one of the most common and since it is highly resistant to cold it can be found even at 1700m. The Pinus halepensis prefers the lower slopes and is found up to 1200m. The third pine found in the park is Pino piñonero. Its presence is entirely due to reforestation. For more informations on Abies Pinsapo.

Wild Olive / acebuche (Olea europea)
The wild olive tree or acebuche is one of the species best adapted to the Mediterranean climate.

Willow / sauce
Deciduous trees found along river valleys.